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More about Google Glass Technology

More about Google Glass Technology

By now you have probably heard or seen news about the Google Glass tool that is one of the most significant steps into the world of ‘wearable computing’.

Google Glass attaches to the right side of a special glasses frame and projects an image just above your right eye that is overlaid onto your normal view.

It also includes photo and video recording and is touch sensitive and can respond to voice commands.  Rather than use headphones it transmits sound by vibrating a bone near your ear.

This video shows some examples of how it could be used:

Google chairman Eric Schmidt has recently given some more details about Google Glass in an interview with the BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0181d41

  • The first wave of Explorer Edition Glass headsets began shipping to developers a few weeks ago and the first Glass apps are already being rolled out, including one that is Blink activated.
  • Google will probably be making some changes to the Explorer Edition before a final consumer release goes ahead in early 2014.
  • The glasses can be controlled by your voice and this function is activated by saying “Google Glass” followed by your command.

It also seems that at least initially adverts will not be allowed to be shown on Google Glass, contrary to this parody video which shows what the same Google Glass world filled with ads might be like:

Google’s aim is to make the technology seamless and move it out of your way, so for example you don’t have to take your camera out to take a photo or take your smartphone out of your pocket to chat with someone.

Debate is continuing around the world about the social appropriateness of someone wearing Google Glass when they are talking face to face, and some businesses are already suggesting that they won’t be allowing customers to wear and use Google Glass while they are on the premises.

No doubt a social code will emerge for appropriate usage, but so far users seem to be finding them most useful when they are walking outdoors, using them to locate businesses or tourist landmarks, among other things.

About Simon Attrill

Simon Attrill is a senior member of the hairyLemon development team. Simon attended the 2012 Google IO Developers conference and has an ongoing interest in everything Google.
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